Quill & Quire

May 9, 2016

by Robert J. Wiersema

We have seen the sort of world depicted in Claudia Casper's new novel before: a near-future dystopia, wracked in the wake of a global war and an environmental cataclysm, with governments driven to extreme measures to protect the lives of their citizens. The great strength of Casper's work, though, is that it doesn't focus on the larger scale, allowing the political and ecological landscape to form a backdrop for the deeply immersive, character-based storytelling we have come to expect from the Vancouver writer. 

Publisher's Weekly

March 25, 2016

It's 2047, and a third world war and climate change have left billions dead. A new global government has created a set of emergency laws to facilitate humanity's survival. Allen "Mercy" Quincy enforces new environmental standards. But Allen isn't without his demons, not the least of which is the unknown location of his two sons. He suffers from PTSD and journals as a process of "mnemectomy"—attempting to degrade unwanted memories by placing them outside of himself.

The Vancouver Sun

March 25, 2016

Claudia Casper’s third novel, The Mercy Journals, addresses a timely issue: how to live in a degraded world. The first point is that many people don’t. We learn right at the beginning that the journals are found on Vancouver Island in 2072, along with the remains of a human being and a cougar. Allen Quincy, whose nickname is Mercy, writes his two journals in 2047, after a great die-off and the restructuring of the political system in OneWorld.

The Independent: The Reconstruction

June 9, 2011

“[The Reconstruction is] a springboard for Casper’s ferocious wit. Her observations of her heroine’s willful decent into primitive eccentricity are deft, her evocation of creative and academic obsession a delight, and her eventual award of hard-won happiness believable rather than pat. All in all, this is a sparkler of a first novel.”

The Observer

June 9, 2011

“The strands [of The Reconstruction] are elegantly woven in prose that combines strength and precision with great lightness of touch. . . . a tale that is individually absorbing and which effectively carries much wider and more primeval resonances.”—Christina Patterson

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