Trump's Wall Foretold

July 27, 2016

Givner's thoughtful analysis iof The Mercy Journals s a gift. "Claudia Casper's new novel adds to a growing body of work designated as "cli-fi", a genre distinct from sci-fi and fantasy, because the horrors described are not futuristic fantasies but predictions of a certain future. Fans of Casper's highly successful first novel, The Reconstruction, will find The Mercy Journals darker and more complex. Both explore what it means to become fully human and, specifically, the part played by memory in that process."

CBC and Spotify - 7 Tangles with The Mercy Journals

June 3, 2016

Here are links and a few choice quotes from recent reviewers and Q&As

CBC SUMMER READING LIST

Great company - Louise Erdrich, Matti Freeman, Emma Straub, Alissa York, Carmen Aguirre:

http://www.cbc.ca/books/2016/05/cbc-books-summer-2016-reading-list.html

Excerpt from Q&A (linked below) with CBC Books' Jane van Koeverden ("Casper's fearless new novel"):

Yiddish Policeman's Union: the Pleasure of Arriving Late to the Ball

June 3, 2016

I just finished reading The Yiddish Policeman's Union by Michael Chabon. That this novel exists feels like a kind of miracle. I want to send a cry of delight out to the universe of reader's joy. The mysterious alchemy Chabon achieves of Yiddishkeit, Jewish history, alternative history, Alaska, Tlingit culture, detective noir is like finding a diamond at the beach. It's an utterly subversive work.

Quill & Quire

May 9, 2016

by Robert J. Wiersema

We have seen the sort of world depicted in Claudia Casper's new novel before: a near-future dystopia, wracked in the wake of a global war and an environmental cataclysm, with governments driven to extreme measures to protect the lives of their citizens. The great strength of Casper's work, though, is that it doesn't focus on the larger scale, allowing the political and ecological landscape to form a backdrop for the deeply immersive, character-based storytelling we have come to expect from the Vancouver writer. 

Metaphor and the Sacred

April 14, 2016

Discussed: 

My answer to a question at the Vancouver Writer's Festival Incite reading with Yann Martel at the Vancouver Public Library a couple of weeks ago. "For me the natural world is where I go to find the sacred, and that feeling that something is sacred is important in my life. I think that a religious sensibility is hard-wired into us, I don't think we have a choice, even if we're atheists, there is a part of our consciousness that transcends our day to day reality.

Publisher's Weekly

March 25, 2016

It's 2047, and a third world war and climate change have left billions dead. A new global government has created a set of emergency laws to facilitate humanity's survival. Allen "Mercy" Quincy enforces new environmental standards. But Allen isn't without his demons, not the least of which is the unknown location of his two sons. He suffers from PTSD and journals as a process of "mnemectomy"—attempting to degrade unwanted memories by placing them outside of himself.

The Vancouver Sun

March 25, 2016

Claudia Casper’s third novel, The Mercy Journals, addresses a timely issue: how to live in a degraded world. The first point is that many people don’t. We learn right at the beginning that the journals are found on Vancouver Island in 2072, along with the remains of a human being and a cougar. Allen Quincy, whose nickname is Mercy, writes his two journals in 2047, after a great die-off and the restructuring of the political system in OneWorld.